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What the World Needs Now

As End of Life Choices California completes its second year (first full year!) and we approach this coming new one, I am struck by what an immense undertaking beginning and developing EOLCCA has been. Claudia, Lynne and I have been running this non-profit organization as volunteers, and we continue to be successful in developing an amazing team of Client Advocate Volunteers who are trained and poised to help any Californian seeking information and/or support in their end of life wishes, at no charge.  It is surprising how many people continue to be unable to access the information they need within their own health care systems.  On the flip side, we are grateful for those systems that can and are willing to provide such information and support.

End of Life Choices California

It’s been a difficult year globally.  Everyone is feeling the effects of Covid-19 and the trickle down economic effect of the pandemic. Politics in the US, and elsewhere, has been tumultuous and painful to watch.  One could become overwhelmed and feel undermined by it all.  I think the feelings must be similar to someone who is facing a terminal illness.  A whole life can change in an instant with a terminal diagnosis and the ensuing challenges that come.

Volunteer powered organization

An Act of Love

I am full of gratitude and hope in the work that we do. I believe that being of service to others is what makes the difference in the world.  I googled “quotes about being in service” and there were so many good ones, I couldn’t pick a favorite.  But for me, being of service is an act of love. And I am full of gratitude for our clients who give us the opportunity to engage in these acts of love, to our volunteers who step up to meet the needs of our clients, and our amazing Board of Directors who are donating their time and energy to help us grow in a sustainable way.

 

What the World Needs Now

I awakened this morning with a song in my head and heart that I hadn’t heard in a long time.  I’m sharing it with you now as I think, even though it was recorded in 1966, it is still relevant today and portrays hope for the future. The song reflects my personal belief as to how we are going to overcome the woundedness and grief of this pandemic and of 2020 in general.  There are nuggets of truth and joy and peace and wisdom in the woundedness if we look deeply enough.

What the World Needs Now – Dionne Warwick

I envision a better year for us ahead in 2021. May you find those nuggets of wisdom and peace in your own life.  And, if you feel inspired to help an organization dedicated to being of service to the terminally ill and their families, we would be truly honored to accept your volunteer application or donation of any size.

With gratitude,

Judy

On COVID-19, Flexibility and Compassion

We share this thoughtful blog by EOLCCA Board member Fran Johns, a prolific thinker and writer. While much has changed in the mere 11 days since she wrote this piece, we wanted to share her calming perspective as we go about the hard work of isolating ourselves physically from our normal way of living.  This is also a gentle reminder to all, that EOLCCA volunteers stand ready and available to continue responding to terminally ill individuals and their families seeking information and support to determine their own end of life choices even as this pandemic has altered so much in our daily lives.  Many of those whom we can continue to help during this pandemic are suffering from unrelated end stage cancer and neurodegenerative diagnoses with a 6 months prognosis and need our help now. 

We can be reached at 760-636-8009 or email info@endoflifechoicesca.org. We are here for you.

 

I don’t know about your neighborhood, but Covid-19 is making life interesting here in the San Francisco Bay Area. Difficult for many, devastating for some, and interesting for the rest of us. As of this writing (I recommend the CDC site for accurate data on other areas, other updates) we have sped past the first hundred confirmed cases in the state, and who knows how many of the 10,000+ Californians in self-quarantine are also my Bay Area neighbors.

This little virus brings with it a large bunch of life lessons. Some of them are shared here, as a public service.

First off (I hate to bring politics ever into this space, but what can you do?) if you ever believed anything said by our commander in chief, this is a good time to mend your ways. Covid-19 is not a Democrat hoax, it is not going to disappear in a short time, you really shouldn’t go to work if you’re sick, a vaccine is at best many months away, and good luck finding those test kits that anybody who wants can get. This is only a life lesson in the sense that, in today’s crazy information-overload reality, Truth is hard to find. So, Life Lesson #1: Seek Truth. Read several newspapers if you still read news. Otherwise, visit the CDC site and scroll through more than one mainstream news source, please; do not believe Facebook will give you Truth. Watch PBS and occasionally Fox News; if one disseminates truth, the other reinforces your neighbor’s version of truth – and we’re all in this together.    Covid-19 greenie

Other life lessons are happier, and equally easy to learn. For instance, at my church we very quickly learned to replace hugs and handshakes with fist bumps and peace signs. Not as much fun, but whatever. The ushers are equipped with bulletins and hand-sanitizer. Choir members last Sunday spaced themselves three feet apart, which looked rather elegant – but they sounded the same, i.e. gorgeous. We also learned translations of the word Covid into Hebrew and Yiddish, which I have already forgotten, and which doesn’t matter anyway since the name was chosen by the World Health Organization thusly: Co and Vi come from coronavirus, D stands for disease and 19 (as in 2019) = the year the first cases were seen. To connect all this: I belong to a Presbyterian church that is heavy into hugs, scientific truth and interfaith understanding.

As to flexibility, this viral pandemic is teaching us, wisely, not to be so rigid about stuff. I was dismayed when the San Francisco Symphony cancelled a concert on my regular series that I really wanted to hear; and the political roundtable at the Commonwealth Club, a favorite regular program at which I always volunteer, similarly disappeared. But symphony season will resume in good time, and do we really need to talk politics late into the evening when it invariably produces nightmares? Sleep is better. That long-planned trip to Tucson in a couple of weeks? Probably not the wisest thing for my octogenarian cardiovascular system. Purpose of trip, however, was to join my daughter for a visit with a childhood friend of hers (whose mother, lost to cancer decades ago, was a good friend of mine) – and they can definitely have a ball without me.

So take deep breaths and wash your hands. We and the planet will survive in good time.

Moon & clouds