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Temple Sinai Oakland

End-of-Life Choice in California: The Options and the Jewish Perspective
California enacted the End of Life Option Act in 2016 and it was renewed–and enhanced–in 2022.
  • Do you know what the act covers and how it changed?
  • Are you familiar with the other legal options that are available to you at the end of life?
  • Do you know the Jewish perspective on end-of-life choice?
Please join us for a conversation about end-of-life choice in California. The presenters, all affiliated with Temple Sinai in Oakland, are:
  • Rabbi Andrea Berlin, Temple Sinai
  • Stewart Florsheim, Board Member, End of Life Choice California
  • Ann Gordon, Manager, End of Life Option Program, Kaiser Permanente, NCAL
The event will take place on Sunday, April 24, at 1pm. Here is a link to the registration form.

Connect! mid-week group zoom session 1 at La Verne Church of the Brethren

The Culture of Dying:
Because we had such a positive response to the Dia de Los Muertos celebration Sunday, October 31 and learning about Latin American countries’ approaches to death and dying, we thought it might be helpful to look at how we in America approach death and dying.  So to that end, we invite you to participate in our virtual 3 part series: The Culture of Dying, where we can explore our own experiences.
What you will learn:
How varied our experiences of death may have been for each of us.  We will talk about how we remember and honor those we have lost and how much they impact our ideas about death and dying. We will become more informed about all the end-of-life options available in the US. We will learn about an additional option, medical aid in dying, available in California and 10 other states in the US.  We hope to create a very safe space where we can share our experiences and our hopes for a peaceful death and how we might want to be remembered.
Presenter: Lynne Calkins, Nurse Practitioner, retired, and constituent of LVCOB

Do You Have an Advance Directive?

Although conversations about Advance Care Planning may seem awkward at first, they often bring family members closer together. 

Talking about death/end of life is deeply personal. Sharing beliefs and desires with those closest to you produces a more intimate relationship.

It takes courage to have these conversations.

It demonstrates your love and deep caring for one another.

couple talking

Advance Care Planning is a process of conversations and directives for all adults that express your health care goals, values, and wishes in case a time arises when you are unable to speak for yourself due to injury or illness.

Here is one way to get The Conversation going:

Q:  Do you have an Advance Directive?

A:  Common responses to that question, with various levels of comfort: 

two men discussing advance planning
  1. A what?
  2. I should but…
  3. I think so?!
  4. Yes, but it needs to be updated.
  5. Yes, so glad!
  6. ……..Silence
    Which response is yours or that of your loved one?  If you would like to get busy creating your AD, get in touch with our volunteers at End of Life Choices California, and/or simply look on our information-rich website here. We will be glad to help you get going with this very important document.

Stefanie Elkins is a guest blogger and a Client Volunteer with End of Life Choices California.  She is also an Elder/End-of-Life Care Coach and Consultant.  Stefanie can be found at Be Present Care in the Los Angeles area.

Medical Aid in Living

People seeking MAID are vibrant, courageous, and thoughtful. They know who they are, define the rules of their life, and are clear on their values, including the meaning of living. My last visits with them are typically marked by a sense of clarity and peace.”

 

Benzi M. Kluger, MD, MS, Medical Aid in Living
JAMA Neurol. Published online August 24, 2020

Dear Readers,

We are sharing this excellent article from JAMA Neuro, recently published online, because it is a beautiful tribute from a physician to medical aid in dying (MAID).  For many people there is so much mystery about the process of medical aid in dying.  For some, as with any uncertainty, this can bring anxiety and fear to the table.  As someone who has worked with people facing their dying for nearly ten years, I never cease to be moved at witnessing the grace, courage and honesty that people show when facing end of life decisions. The author of this piece does a beautiful job of describing not only his patient’s journey in accessing medical aid in dying, but also those of others.

I had the honor of speaking to a young woman recently who reached out to End of Life Choices California.  At 35 years old, she is bravely facing a Stage IV breast cancer diagnosis for which she has been told there is no cure.  She is just realizing that she not only needs to plan her life, but needs to plan her death.  We discussed many things, but the one thing that I think brought her comfort was hearing about what it is like to actually die from taking a lethal dose of medication through MAID.  I shared with her that through the many experiences I have had over the years of attending MAID deaths, the overarching feeling I have always observed and experienced is one of peace.  When people who are already dying are given the chance to be in the driver’s seat of their experience, rather than allowing the disease to wreak havoc in their lives and the lives of their loved ones, there is a peacefulness that comes with that.  Family is present, love is shared, goodbyes are heartfelt.  The person dying is able to relax and be held in love as they die.

What more could any of us want, truly?

peaceful river scene

My experience with this is why I have stayed active in the field and why I helped spearhead the formation of End of Life Choices California.  In the article, the physician said the referring physician “had not developed a response to requests for MAID and did not know if she would participate”.  We see this all the time here.  Part of our mission is to provide education to physicians and hospices in order to help eliminate this major barrier to end of life care.  We can help a physician wishing to learn more about MAID by putting him/her in touch with other physicians who are experienced and willing to offer guidance and support.

 

We also encourage all individuals who are thinking about their end of life care and wishes to have a conversation with their primary or specialist physicians NOW.  These conversations take time.  Many physicians are still grappling with how to deal with a MAID request. It is important to identify a physician who will support your end of life choices, whatever they may be, prior to a time you are actually ready to act on those important decisions. Discussions about Advance Care Planning with family and physicians are helpful in this regard. You can find guidance on our website here.

California is making great progress.  The 2019 California Department of Public Health’s annual data report on the use of California’s End of Life Option Act showed that 37% more physicians prescribed MAID than in the previous year.  That gives us hope that we will one day be out of a job.  But for now, we continue to help those who contact EOLCCA looking for support and information about end of life choices.

If you would like to support End of Life Choices California’s work, please make a donation.  We are very grateful for gifts of all sizes.  Thank you.